l2pnet.com http://www.l2pnet.com l2pnet.com Sun, 25 Sep 2016 02:13:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 The Solo Gigger: Movin’ Out (?) http://www.l2pnet.com/solo-gigger-movin/ http://www.l2pnet.com/solo-gigger-movin/#respond Sun, 25 Sep 2016 02:13:19 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2611 by Riley Wilson One of the critical factors for successful solo musicians is to live in an area with sufficient work. Because some areas of the country or world change over time, moving can become a necessity. I have done this many times in my life for personal and professional reasons and the results have […]

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by Riley Wilson

One of the critical factors for successful solo musicians is to live in an area with sufficient work. Because some areas of the country or world change over time, moving can become a necessity. I have done this many times in my life for personal and professional reasons and the results have been rewarding.

The late session great Tommy Tedesco encouraged players serious about a music career to relocate to a bigger city in his book, “For Guitar Players Only.” When I moved to Los Angeles in 1983, I was inspired to work harder than I ever had as a musician. Just being in a different town can often catapult your work to another level.

Why move at all? If you live in a small to medium sized town, there may be few, if any places to perform. If there isn’t anyone going to restaurants, pubs, taverns and coffeehouse with entertainment, it might be time to look at moving. If your town has moved away from live entertainment to mostly DJ’s and dance clubs, a bigger market may allow you more potential places to gig. If you live up north, you may find a warmer climate has a longer or year round performing season.

Before you call a moving company, make a list about why you’re considering moving. Be sure you have recently spoken to anyone and everyone in your current town for possible gigs. Ask yourself where you might find more work. Will you have enough money to afford the move and then a period of little to no work until you become established? What types of music do you perform and can you adapt to a new style in demand in a new location? Are you married and/or have children? Are they supportive and realize a move is disruptive and that they will have to start over with friends, school, church, etc.? Will the possible rewards make the risk worth it? If possible, contact friends, colleagues and potential agents and venues for information about the new town.

A short visit following considerable internet research can prove fruitful and invaluable. Make a pros and cons list and study it out in your mind before pulling any triggers. If you are of a religious bent–as I am–then I suggest fervent prayer to verify your choice before packing it in and heading down the highway.

Once you’re relocated, be sure to update your contact information and let people know what you’re looking to accomplish. Resolve to put in substantial time looking for work. Make a contact list and use this to help network with other musicians, agents and venues. Get new business cards and give them out liberally. If you’re on national booking sites like Gigmasters, Gig Salad, Thumbtack, etc. you may find you get more or less work in the new community. If this happens, simply keep networking and introducing yourself to potential clubs, restaurants, bars, agents and the like. If you are talented and hard working, you will eventually land work.

Don’t let your foot off the accelerator pedal, however. Like a business associate once said, “the time to start looking for your next job is once you land the current one!” Be patient and realize it may be a year or longer before you start working regularly.

Each move I have done has helped me get ahead musically. I am fortunate to have enjoyed my time and gigs in California, North Carolina and most recently, Texas. If you feel stifled in your current town, do some research and don’t rule out a move. It might be beneficial and profitable for you, too.

Riley Wilson is a Dallas, TX based solo gigger, music teacher and voice talent. His websites are www.guitarmadesimpler.com and www.wrileywilson.com

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Emily Estefan to Receive WorldArts DOTY Award http://www.l2pnet.com/emily-estefan-receive-worldarts-doty-award/ http://www.l2pnet.com/emily-estefan-receive-worldarts-doty-award/#respond Tue, 06 Sep 2016 15:32:12 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2606 The LATIN SONGWRITERS HALL OF FAME/ LA MUSA AWARDS and WORLDARTS has announced that emerging singer-songwriter Emily Estefan will receive the WorldArts Discovery of the Year Award during the 4th annual LA MUSA AWARDS ceremony.The WorldArts Discovery of the Year Award is given to promising young talent at the start of their careers. Larry Underwood, […]

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The LATIN SONGWRITERS HALL OF FAME/ LA MUSA AWARDS and WORLDARTS has announced that emerging singer-songwriter Emily Estefan will receive the WorldArts Discovery of the Year Award during the 4th annual LA MUSA AWARDS ceremony.The WorldArts Discovery of the Year Award is given to promising young talent at the start of their careers.

Larry Underwood, Founder and CEO of WorldArts said, “We are absolutely thrilled to have chosen Emily Estefan to receive the 1st annual WorldsArts Discovery of The Year Award established with us by the Latin Songwriters Hall Of Fame to be presented at the LA MUSA AWARDS. Emily is one of the most exciting and dynamic new singer-songwriters to emerge on the scene and we look forward to watching her steadily rise and keep bringing her amazing music to the world far into the future.”

For Desmond Child, LSHOF Chairman/CEO, “Emily has created a unique sound incorporating all the incredible music she grew up with and the sounds of her own generation with the ease of an artist far beyond her years. I would like to sincerely congratulate her on this prestigious new award from WorldArts which is totally deserved.”

“We are so excited to have Emily receive the WorldArts Discovery of the Year Award this year, it’s so deserved because I had the pleasure of being knocked out by Emily’s talent during the Miami Beach Centennial mega celebration concert that I produced with my friends at ACT Productions. I was totally blown away, I had no idea how gifted Emily is, she’s the real deal and we wouldn’t expect anything less coming from the Estefan Musical Dynasty,” said LSHOF President Rudy Perez.

The 2016 LA MUSA AWARDS will be held on Thursday, October 13th at The Fillmore Miami Beach Jackie Gleason Theater, directed by Richard Jay-Alexander, conducted by Eduardo Marturet (Miami Symphony Orchestra) and presented by WorldArts (WorldArts.com). This year’s Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame inductees are Los Temerarios (Adolfo & Gustavo Ángel Alba), Draco Rosa, Alejandro Jaen, Claudia Brant, Miguel Luna and Cheo Zorilla.

About Emily Estefan
Emily Estefan is not only part of a musical dynasty, in her own right she’s a musical force to be reckoned with. She founded Alien Shrimp Records in the hopes that it would not only be a home for her original music, but also a place for new and emerging artists to thrive and truly express themselves creatively. Emily earned a degree in contemporary writing and production from Boston’s prestigious Berklee College of Music. Her label, Alien Shrimp Records and RED Distribution announced a newly inked partnership for physical and digital distribution throughout the U.S. and Canada, as well as worldwide digital distribution, for its entire roster. She is the 2017 recipient of the WorldArts discovery of the Year Award.

About the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame
The Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame is a 501c3 non-profit organization founded by renowned songwriter/producers Desmond Child & Rudy Pérez in 2012 and modeled after the high standards set by the Songwriters Hall Of Fame. Our mission is to educate, preserve, honor and celebrate the lives and music of the world’s greatest Latin songwriters, composers and lyricists in every genre while developing and inspiring new generations of music creators through master classes, workshops, scholarships and digital initiatives.

About WorldArts.com
WorldArts is the premiere global resource for artists to connect directly with fans, brands, and industry professionals. We offer artists live performance opportunities and an e-commerce platform to sell and license their music so they can monetize their career. Our crowd funding platform allow fans to share in this journey by helping artists tour and continue producing their music. Fans are also rewarded with exclusive offers and can share content so they can be a part of finding the ‘next big thing’. Our mission is to bring the music world under one roof and make it a better place for everyone. At WorldArts… it’s all about the music.

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New Releases: Sky Between Leaves “Klein Blues” http://www.l2pnet.com/new-releases-sky-leaves-klein-blues/ http://www.l2pnet.com/new-releases-sky-leaves-klein-blues/#respond Tue, 06 Sep 2016 14:36:43 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2600 Sky Between Leaves is an East London based Brazilian post punk/krautrock act made up of Tito Cordeiro (guitar/vocals), Brenno Balbino (Bass/ synthesizers) and Juliana Favero (Drums/ Percussion). The band, who take their name from Jarvis Cocker’s anecdote about wearing glasses for the first time and realising that the holes in the trees were the sky, […]

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Sky Between Leaves is an East London based Brazilian post punk/krautrock act made up of Tito Cordeiro (guitar/vocals), Brenno Balbino (Bass/ synthesizers) and Juliana Favero (Drums/ Percussion).

The band, who take their name from Jarvis Cocker’s anecdote about wearing glasses for the first time and realising that the holes in the trees were the sky, have supported seminal alternative acts Robin Guthrie (Cocteau Twins), The Telescopes, Mark Gardner (Ride), AR Kane and resurgent bands of English C86 scene The Woodentops, Blue Orchids and 14 Iced Bears. The trio is gearing up for the release of their debut four track EP ‘Klein Blues’, which is scheduled for release digitally and as a limited edition 10″ blue vinyl via Horus Music and Bandshell Records.
The Krautrock inspired ‘Out Of Body Experience’ is an aptly named track that takes inspiration from the phenomenon in which some people experience the sensation of floating outside their physical body during times of mental unconsciousness. Sky Between Leaves delivers a dream inducing, genre defying pearl that is the perfect sonic accompaniment for Brion Gysin’s Dreamachine.

Title track ‘Klein Blues’ is a stunning example of Dreampop, inspired by the leading member of Nouveau Réalisme (New Realism), French artist Yves Klein. Also, considered one of the forerunners of Pop Art.

‘Shell Beach’ is a Space Rock / Krautrock composition that takes inspiration from Alex Proyas’ neo-noir film Dark City (1998), in which the protagonist sets out to piece together hazy memories of his wife. In order to do so, he goes in a quest to find the elusive seaside place called Shell Beach, where he is alleged to have grown up as a boy.

Post Punk track ‘Joke Is Over’ addresses the issues of bullying and gun violence which permeate modern society. (Press release provided by label)

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Pray For Sound To Release Everything Is Beautiful http://www.l2pnet.com/pray-sound-release-everything-beautiful/ http://www.l2pnet.com/pray-sound-release-everything-beautiful/#respond Tue, 06 Sep 2016 14:17:19 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2597 Pray for Sound had its origins as a solo studio project started by Bruce Malley in late 2011. He had been diagnosed with a large destructive cyst called a cholesteatoma growing inside his left ear that inhibited his hearing. Despite doctors’ best efforts, he was left with severe hearing loss, tinnitus, and recurring pain. To […]

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Pray for Sound had its origins as a solo studio project started by Bruce Malley in late 2011. He had been diagnosed with a large destructive cyst called a cholesteatoma growing inside his left ear that inhibited his hearing. Despite doctors’ best efforts, he was left with severe hearing loss, tinnitus, and recurring pain. To many musicians and songwriters such a development would be a death sentence, but Malley used his ordeal as inspiration, translating these intensely emotional experiences into instrumental post-rock compositions. Steve Aliperta, Joe Aylward, Chris LaRocque, and Nick Stewart were recruited to help Malley bring Pray for Sound to the stage, and the band quickly made a name for themselves in their native Boston.

The third release from Pray for Sound, Everything Is Beautiful, communicates the dichotic concept of light vs. dark without a single spoken word. As the follow up to the band’s 2014 album Dreamer, Everything Is Beautiful marks an all in decision to dedicate their energies towards the band. “The five of us left our ‘real lives’ behind in Massachusetts and relocated up to Glover, Vermont for eight days with all our music equipment,” recalls Malley. “No distractions or stress.” Removing all societal participation built quite a euphoric experience for the band, and allowed them to find renewed creativity in their songwriting. The eleven new songs found on Everything Is Beautiful feature turbulent guitar riffs and heart pounding drums accompanied by sweeping and all encompassing undercurrents of sound that evoke the likes of My Bloody Valentine, Tycho, and Explosions in the Sky. “We discovered a newfound excitement for the music we were making,” says Malley of the time spent writing and recording Everything Is Beautiful. “We took our time to finish our ideas, and the end result is something we’re all incredibly proud of.”

Everything Is Beautiful was written, recorded, produced, and mixed by the band themselves. The band is accompanied by a united release from I Am Shark, AM/FM Records, and dunk!records (EU) coordinating a full-length release via Digital/CD/Vinyl/Merch on September 23rd, 2016.

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Stage Plots: What They Are, Why You Need One, How To Make One http://www.l2pnet.com/stage-plots-what-they-are-why-you-need-one-how-to-make-one/ http://www.l2pnet.com/stage-plots-what-they-are-why-you-need-one-how-to-make-one/#respond Sat, 27 Aug 2016 03:58:34 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=1595 What goes where? That is the question and the stage plot is the answer. This simple picture is usually nothing more than a large rectangle that represents the stage that shows where the musicians and their gear will be located within it. Guitar and Bass amplifiers and speaker cabinets (including monitors) are typically represented with […]

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What goes where?

That is the question and the stage plot is the answer. This simple picture is usually nothing more than a large rectangle that represents the stage that shows where the musicians and their gear will be located within it.

Guitar and Bass amplifiers and speaker cabinets (including monitors) are typically represented with smaller rectangles, and the drums and cymbals with circles. Keyboards are usually just elongated rectangles, but sometime a representation of the actual keys can be added in.

another stage plot 060713 Stage Plot

Microphones can be represented with anything from a “x” to a small circle to a small mic icon. Often the lead vocalist’s mic is represented with a star (they seem to like that).

Other items can be on the stage plot including where power strips and D.I. boxes need to be placed, and even the names of the musicians in the various positions. The stage plot is usually accompanied with an input list of what will be plugged into the mixing console.

Stage plot example

Why a stage plot?

The stage plot is generally for the crew so they know where to place the gear as it is being loaded into the venue and being set up. In addition to the band’s gear, it shows where the risers, monitors, mic stands, and other gear being provided by the production company or the venue.

Since the stage plot is usually included with the contract for booking is faxed (or emailed) to the venue when the band’s production manager or soundman advances the gig, the initial staging (monitors, risers) is often in place before the band’s gear arrives.

(“Advancing the gig” is the term used for when the production manager who is the band’s or artist’s representative calls the venue and the company providing the pro audio, lights, stage (if not provided by the venue) to make sure that the list gear needed will actually be there, that any stage hands needed will be there at the appointed time, to be certain that food and beverages will be provided at the appropriate times, who will be the contact person at the venue, etc.)

The soundman and the monitor engineer will also use the stage plot in various ways including knowing before hand what gear they will need. And a nice perk is their being able to call the players by name during soundcheck instead of “hey, guitar player.”

Stage plot example

As musicians are generally creative types, and Photoshop has become a common tool, some stage plots have become more than the simple line art that they used to be. Actual images of amps, mics, and other gear helps assure the correct piece of gear is placed where it belongs. After all, Guitar Amp 1 and Guitar Amp 2 might be easily confused, but a Fender Twin Reverb and Vox AC-30 look different enough that they should end up in the right place.

Sloppy stage plot example

Some musicians have found themselves confronted with the need of a stage plot and hastily drawn them out by hand (yours truly is included with the group of musicians). This is less than optimum (too much room for errors) and certainly lacks the professional air one would assume that they would want their band to have…although, some wacky art might help defuse the issue.

Humorous stage plot example

If you want to try your hand at designing your stage plot without a lot of hassle, check out www.freestageplots.com where you select your instruments and drag and drop them on the stage.

An input list can be equally useful to the production crew, especially if it is coordinated with the stage plot. The list should follow some kind of order, such as grouping the vocals together (and aside from the lead vocalist, having them plotted left to right as the soundman views the stage). The order of importance helps to a degree, especially if there are a limited number of channels available on the board. The input list is also where mic preference and D.I. are listed.Elliot stage plot example

Some soundman conceived the road crew t-shirt that had the stage plot and input list printed on it…upside down…so they could read it while wearing it! Genious!!

A simple stage plot and input list goes a long way in making your band look professional. Carry a spare in your guitar case could save the day, as could having the image uploaded to your website and iphone…where it would nearly always be on hand and instantly forwarded to whoever needs it.

– Jake Kelly

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Over 500 new progressive, modern and technical metal grooves http://www.l2pnet.com/500-new-progressive-modern-technical-metal-grooves/ http://www.l2pnet.com/500-new-progressive-modern-technical-metal-grooves/#respond Mon, 15 Aug 2016 21:34:02 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2592 Submitted by FXpansion Audio software developer FXpansion and drummer Dan Foord (Sikth, Krokodil) have announced the availability of Dan Foord Polyrhythmic Metal, a BFD3 Groove Pack loaded with progressive, modern and technical metal grooves. Dan Foord Polyrhythmic Metal contains more than enough grooves and fills for any songwriter to quickly create fully authentic metal drum […]

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Submitted by FXpansion

Audio software developer FXpansion and drummer Dan Foord (Sikth, Krokodil) have announced the availability of Dan Foord Polyrhythmic Metal, a BFD3 Groove Pack loaded with progressive, modern and technical metal grooves. Dan Foord Polyrhythmic Metal contains more than enough grooves and fills for any songwriter to quickly create fully authentic metal drum tracks.

With over 500 grooves in total, each of the included 26 palettes contains related grooves and fills to help you construct drum tracks quickly and efficiently. Each groove features techniques Dan regularly uses, including:

● Beat displacement and modulation
● Related tempo and time signatures
● Varied orchestration
● Ghost note grooves
● Paradiddle and linear fills
● Single stroke rolls

“I wanted to create a BFD Groove Pack that would be instantly identifiable as modern tech metal.” Says Foord, who has been at the forefront of progressive metal drumming for more than a decade. “Polyrhythms in particular form the basis of this style and 3 over 4 most of all. I can honestly say you won’t find a more comprehensive set of 3 over 4 polyrhythmic grooves and fills anywhere.”

BFD3 is the third generation of FXpansion’s flagship software acoustic drum studio delivers new levels of detail and realism with stunning new kits, mix-ready presets and modeling technology for tom resonance and cymbal swells. The revamped interface has a new mixer and sound browser for the easiest BFD experience yet.

Dan Foord Polyrhythmic Metal is available to purchase and download directly from FXpansion for USD $39.00 here:
https://www.fxpansion.com/products/bfdx/bfdgroovepacks/dan-foord-polyrhythmic-metal

Note that Dan Foord Polyrhythmic Metal requires a registered copy of BFD3 which is available to purchase as a download or boxed USB version from FXpansion for USD $349.00 here: https://www.fxpansion.com/products/bfd3/

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Mitchell Debuts Line of Premium Electric Guitars and Basses http://www.l2pnet.com/mitchell-debuts-line-premium-electric-guitars-basses/ http://www.l2pnet.com/mitchell-debuts-line-premium-electric-guitars-basses/#respond Mon, 15 Aug 2016 20:16:24 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2587 These instruments introduce fresh designs, inspired by classic styles, for every type of player. Available in a variety of colors & finishes. The new Mitchell TD Series guitars offer a modern take on familiar double-cutaway electrics guitars and are a great choice for blues and rock traditionalists, while the MS Series feature a beautiful single-cutaway […]

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These instruments introduce fresh designs, inspired by classic styles, for every type of player. Available in a variety of colors & finishes.

The new Mitchell TD Series guitars offer a modern take on familiar double-cutaway electrics guitars and are a great choice for blues and rock traditionalists, while the MS Series feature a beautiful single-cutaway design, with a slim-tapered, set neck profile for rock, metal, blues, and jazz aficionados. For hard rock and jazz virtuosos, the HD Series guitars offer an offset double cutaway, floating tremolo, bolt-on neck, and an HSH pickup configuration. The Mitchell MD series features three 3 different lines, created for the modern rocker who seeks a contemporary look and aggressive sound. Choose from the flagship MD400 (set neck/carved top), the MD300 (bolt-on neck/carve top) and the MD200 (bolt-on, flat-top) series. There are also short-scale models, ideal for younger players or for use as travel guitars, called the MM Series.

The new Mitchell line also features three separate bass series, including the flagship FB Series, the more traditional TB line and the MB Series. Offering different finishes, pickup configurations and variety of price points, the Mitchell electric basses are truly premium instruments that will appeal to a variety of players.

The new Mitchell Electric Guitar line is ready to turn heads and deliver on the promise of exceptional construction, outstanding components and unsurpassed playability.

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News: She Rocks Awards Opening Act Contest http://www.l2pnet.com/news-rocks-awards-opening-act-contest/ http://www.l2pnet.com/news-rocks-awards-opening-act-contest/#respond Mon, 15 Aug 2016 19:39:22 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2583 The Women’s International Music Network (the WiMN), in partnership with #SaveAGuitar has announced the #SaveAGuitar and She Rocks Awards contest. The contest will award one winner the opening spot performing at the 5th annual She Rocks Awards on Friday, January 20, 2017, at the Winter NAMM show in Anaheim, CA. The winner will also receive […]

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The Women’s International Music Network (the WiMN), in partnership with #SaveAGuitar has announced the #SaveAGuitar and She Rocks Awards contest. The contest will award one winner the opening spot performing at the 5th annual She Rocks Awards on Friday, January 20, 2017, at the Winter NAMM show in Anaheim, CA.

The winner will also receive a Breedlove Pursuit Concert acoustic-electric guitar and feature profiles on the WiMN website and the #SaveAGuitar site. Also included in the prize pack is a pair of tickets to the awards, as well as a badge to attend the NAMM show. Ten lucky runners-up will receive a feature on the #SaveAGuitar site and socials, a feature on the WiMN socials, plus a Breedlove T-shirt.

Contestants can enter by submitting their bio, along with links to their favorite performance and social media links, plus a short narrative sharing why playing guitar is important to them and why they love the guitar before the September 30, 2016 deadline. Winners will be selected from among all eligible entries, and announced before November 1, 2016. For complete contest rules and to enter, visit www.thewimn.com/saveaguitar-contest/.

The WiMN Founder, Laura B. Whitmore, comments, “In addition to recognizing accomplished musicians, we’re also always on the lookout for bright, emerging talents, and so we’re thrilled to partner with #SaveAGuitar to offer this exciting opportunity for a deserving new musician to perform for their peers at the 5th annual She Rocks Awards.”

The She Rocks Awards pays tribute to women who display leadership and stand out within the music industry, and has become a standard at the NAMM Show. Previous award recipients include female industry leaders such as Jennifer Batten, Karmin, Colbie Caillat, Sheila E, The Bangles, Orianthi, Dinah Gretsch, Craigie Zildjian, Janie L. Hendrix, Amani Duncan, Mary Peavey, and more. The event brings together industry professionals, music icons, artists, fans and media to celebrate women in music.

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On Tour: Phil Rudd http://www.l2pnet.com/tour-phil-rudd/ http://www.l2pnet.com/tour-phil-rudd/#respond Mon, 15 Aug 2016 19:32:57 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2579 Described by Malcolm Young, co-founder of AC/DC, as “the real deal”, PHIL RUDD the band’s long term drummer, played in several Melbourne bands such as Buster Brown and The Coloured Balls before joining up with the rock giants in 1975. Rudd powered the band to superstardom with his dogged consistency and unshakeable backbeat on classics […]

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Described by Malcolm Young, co-founder of AC/DC, as “the real deal”, PHIL RUDD the band’s long term drummer, played in several Melbourne bands such as Buster Brown and The Coloured Balls before joining up with the rock giants in 1975.

Rudd powered the band to superstardom with his dogged consistency and unshakeable backbeat on classics like ‘It’s A Long Way To The Top (If You Want To Rock ’N’ Roll)’ ‘TNT” and ‘Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap’, becoming an indelible part of AC/DC history.

To the untrained ear, Phil Rudd’s drumming may seem rudimentary, but his style and groove have earned him the adoration of generations of his peers. Rammstein’s Christoph Schneider said in the October 2010’s Modern Drummer, “AC/DC were my absolute heroes because they are simple and easy to copy, though soon you find they are not so easy to copy.” The magazine’s May 2010 issue also honoured the rocker with the feature ’50 Reasons To Love Phil Rudd’.

Rudd has appeared on all but three of AC/DC’s 18 studio albums, which have sold more than 200 million copies worldwide. When the blockbusting album ‘Highway to Hell’ went multi-platinum worldwide, Rudd said he ‘‘went straight down the road to buy my first Ferrari’’ sparking a lifelong love of luxury cars. Rudd showcased eleven of his luxury cars in Christchurch, New Zealand as part of an earthquake appeal fundraiser, his current collection includes a rare 1991 Ferrari F40, a brand new Ferrari 599, two Lamborghinis, a 2010 Rolls Royce Ghost, 2011 Bentley Mulsanne and Bentley super sport, Audi R8 V10, a 2011 Aston Martin DBS and 2010 Mercedes SLS AMG. The cars have a combined worth of approximately $3m. Rudd’s airport hangar is also home to his MD 520N helicopter.

With the lavish rock star lifestyle firmly in place, Phil Rudd recorded and released his first debut album ‘Head Job’ with Kiwi musicians Allan Badger and Geoffrey Martin in 2014. The album was released via Universal Music Group in Australia & New Zealand but further promotional plans were scuppered by well publicised legal problems in New Zealand.

Rudd served an eight month home detention sentence which thwarted the 2014 release of ‘Head Job’ but 2016 sees him determined to leave his problems in the past. He has embraced a more positive lifestyle and says his “hell raising days are over… I see a psychiatrist once a week and I’m closer than ever to my children. I still have all my flash cars but now I want to grow chillies”.

Phil Rudd has turned a corner, completely dedicating his life to the most important things in his life; family, friends and music. He will be visiting the UK and Europe at the end of September to promote the re-release of ‘Head Job’ and will be available for press, radio and television interviews.

Also see – http://m.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/news/article.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=11638962

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Planet Guitar: Doing the Charity Thing http://www.l2pnet.com/doing-the-charity-thing/ http://www.l2pnet.com/doing-the-charity-thing/#respond Sat, 13 Aug 2016 00:35:42 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2574 BY RONNY NORTH Every year I try to do as many charity events as I reasonably can in my schedule. I firmly believe that it’s a great thing to be able to help great causes with your music if you can. Some of the charities I have been playing for I’ve been doing for more […]

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BY RONNY NORTH

Every year I try to do as many charity events as I reasonably can in my schedule. I firmly believe that it’s a great thing to be able to help great causes with your music if you can.

Some of the charities I have been playing for I’ve been doing for more than a decade. Some of my big charity events every year are the Special Olympics (I’ve done their event for the last 15 years) and various events for the US vets and troops. I have done events that are very lavish with many big stars on hand and the more common bare-bones affairs. Each has their pluses and minuses but both are equally important.

When doing charity events, there are a few things I have found over the years to consider. Let’s go over a few,

 

Rule #1 

Be Genuine

I will only perform at events for causes I truly believe in and understand. This is a big one and it ties directly into the next two rules.

One of the ways in which charity gigs are not that different from any other kind is that word gets around. In the “real”, non-charity world, people talk. Bookers and agents and talent buyers know each other and if you are doing gigs and doing well—which means bringing in people and making money for the people booking you—then it is not unusual to get the attention of a booker or buyer for another venue or festival. (That’s less true now than it was in the past. Today there are so many more bands and artists than there are good gigs that some agents etc just stick with the people/artists/bands they already have a relationship with and breaking through can be difficult, but it still happens.)

The charity world is like that but a little different. It’s more like when you do one charity event, word gets out to organizers of other events for other causes that you are someone who may be open to donating your time. Ask pretty much anyone who has ever done a charity gig and they will likely tell you that in the days/weeks/months after, they got calls from organizers of events for other charities noting they saw you at Charity A’s event and would you consider doing a show for Charity B.

Like most people who do regular charity gigs, I get quite a few more requests than I can accommodate. So I only do events for groups whose cause I know and understand and am trying to support. I do the Special Olympics events and the vet/troops events because those are causes I really believe in. More on this in Rule #3.

 

Rule #2

Be Smart

I also look into the organization if its someone I haven’t performed for before. Over the years there have only been a couple of times when I have had, let’s say, some “shady” dealings with certain charities and when I caught wind of the improprieties, I immediately terminated my relationship them.

There are many worthwhile causes these days. But, falling under the general heading of Sometimes People Just Suck, there is no shortage of “charities” that are either flat out phony or that exist more to pay salaries to the people who run the charity than to actually fund any cause.

As a general rule, no more than 35% of a charity’s revenue should go to administrative and fundraising costs. Those are exactly what they sound like. Administrative can include everything from salaries to renting office space and fundraising costs refer to how much the charity spends to bring in a dollar in new donations.

There has been a concerted effort in the past few years on the part of many charities to get out from under that 35% general rule and if you look online for what is an acceptable level of expense you’ll see whole sites dedicated to what they call the “Overhead Myth.”

Regardless, if the charity is a non-profit, they have to publish that info and you have every right to ask how much of each dollar they collect goes into programs and services for whoever—or whatever—the charity is supposed to be raising money for.

Or, if you are not comfortable asking that question, the info—like everything, pretty much—is online. Check out CharityNavigator.org where you can enter the name of the charity and get a score and a rating based on how the charity spends money and how open and accountable they are.

Bottom line. For better or worse, when you do charity gigs, YOU are associated with that charity and if it comes out later that they were ripping people off or only spending 10 cents of every dollar collected on programs while the other 90 cents were spent on lavish fundraising events and salaries, then it can reflect poorly on you, too. Do your homework on the charities you work with.

 

Rule #3

Be There For the Right Reason

What I have also found out as a happy accident is that charity events can be great networking opportunities and I have met many great people in the industry playing for charities.

But… And this is important. If you are doing the event because  you see it as a marketing opportunity and you don’t really have a connection or belief in what the charity is about, that is going to come through in 1000 tiny ways.

I mentioned earlier that I had done huge events with bunches of big stars there. And I can tell you for sure that charities putting on events like that don’t have a big problem booking acts for the big events. But if you are only “available” for the big ones and are not willing to spend a Sunday morning in a hot parking lot somewhere playing for a few dozen people because that event is part of what makes the big event possible… Well, let’s just say that the people involved in good charities are not dumb. And if you are only there because you think there is something in it for you in terms of other gigs or career advancement, they are gonna know. And you may find yourself getting nothing out of it while the artist who did those Sunday mornings get the attention and opportunities going forward.

If you are Kim and Kanye, you can get away with it because the charity is looking to your fame to bring more people in and by extension raise more money, But for the rest of the world, it just makes you look like a dick.

The bottom line is if you do charity gigs for the right reasons and you really believe in making a difference they are definitely worth your time.  They are also a great way to make a positive deposit in the Bank of Karma.

But this is why I really do charity gigs: I can’t even explain how gratifying it is to perform at these events when you meet the people after you get off stage and you see how much it means to them and that it gets their mind off whatever their issues are for a little while, Best of all, you’re helping a great cause with your music. It doesn’t get much better than that.

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Gear Review: Tech 21 RK5 FlyRig http://www.l2pnet.com/gear-review-tech-21-rk5-flyrig/ http://www.l2pnet.com/gear-review-tech-21-rk5-flyrig/#respond Fri, 15 Jul 2016 21:56:53 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2565 By Rev. Bill I had a size problem. It was too damn big. In November of last year I did the longest run of gigs I have ever done at one venue. We did 19 nights in a span of 25 days at the Aquarius in Laughlin, NV. And I had a epiphany about gear. […]

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By Rev. Bill

I had a size problem. It was too damn big.

In November of last year I did the longest run of gigs I have ever done at one venue. We did 19 nights in a span of 25 days at the Aquarius in Laughlin, NV. And I had a epiphany about gear. Well, to be more accurate about broken gear.

The run was five-days-on, two-days-off for four weeks and in the middle of the 2nd run, I had two guitars—out the three I was carrying—go down. Weird coincidence, but both my 335 and my Black Falcon had one of the wires that feed the output jack come loose. If you have ever tried working on semi-hollow or hollow-body electric guitars, you know they are not easy. All the work has to happen through the F-holes. I made a trip to the local Wal-Mart and bought some fishing line and paper clips for fishing wires out of the body and tying the parts off and grabbed the soldering iron out of the toolbox that I carry on every gig and sat in my room trying to fix ‘em. I succeeded with one and got through the week then headed back to Vegas and my guitar savior Neil Smith who fixed them properly.

But in the days off that week, I thought a lot about gear and gigs and being in a town where the nearest music store was 100 miles away. That is actually a fairly typical situation for us when we play out of town. “Away” gigs for us mean Laughlin and Mesquite. One is 100 miles south of Vegas and the other 100 miles north and neither have a music store.

The guitar situation was a drag but I carry three so I got through it. But I only carry one amp. And it is a 35-year-old-ish Mesa Boogie Mark III. A tube amp. Notoriously finicky. It sounds great but if it went down in mid-run, I was screwed. I needed some kind of backup.

I initially turned to a Line 6 POD HD400. A great piece of gear. I have used most of the same FX modeling that is in the HD400 for a while but I used it in the form of the M9 multi-FX unit from Line 6. But the HD400 added amp modeling and and onboard wha and direct XLR outs that could feed a PA. I tore apart the pedal board i had used for the past couple of years and put the HD400 and my Boogie channel switches and my talk box right on the floor of the stage and finished out the run like that.

It worked OK. I am used to the M9 with six switches for accessing specific effects and the HD400 is set up very differently with three FX slots and each of those fairly limited in what kind of FX they can produce. Ironically, I don’t use a ton of FX. An overdrive, a compressor, a tremolo , a phase shifter and a delay. Pretty meat and potatoes. But getting the combos I wanted on the HD400 was a bitch. The slots are basically setup as drive FX in slot 1, modulation FX in slot 2 and time FX in slot 3. All of that meant I had to set up four different banks to make the combos I wanted and I was still not able to get back to what I was used to.

So when time came to put together a new pedal board I changed my thinking. The HD400 was my backup. I needed it for amp modeling in case my tube amp went tits-up on a gig.So, I grabbed the M9 again and put it all on one board.

And it was enormous.

The Old Pedalboard From Hell. It barely fits into the photo frame.

The Old Pedalboard From Hell. It barely fits into the photo frame.

On the Line 6 tip, the HD400, the M9, a Relay G70 wireless and the non-Line 6, two channel switches, a Heil talk box with a little amp to drive it and an Aphex Xciter. It was more than 44 inches wide and weighed more than 50 lbs. I had no case so I built a frame inside of a giant duffel bag and put wheels on it. It took up so much space in my smallish car (a Chevy HHR)—in which I somehow manage to pack a full PA and my guitar gear—that I found myself in my driveway at 4AM pushing and shoving gear trying to make it all fit before leaving for another out of town run. And it took up a huge amount of stage space.By the time I had done a single run of gigs with it, I knew i had to make a change.

I have known about Tech 21 for a very long time. I first met the team at their HQ in Manhattan back in the ‘90s when I was doing GIG Magazine. Yes, they proudly and somewhat unbelievably manufactured their products in a building in NYC for a very long time. Up until 2002, when they expanded and moved 14 miles west to Clifton, NJ.

But I had never really used any of it. We did a lot of Tech 21 reviews over the years but I always assigned them to someone else. Up until less than a decade ago, I was a modeling amp guy—largely because I play the kinds of gigs where volume is a huge big deal and I need big tone at low volume. When the newer digital modeling offerings stopped offering models of the Mark Series Mesa Boogie combos—my preferred amp models—I tried to make due but could never get the tone I wanted and finally did what I had wanted to do since the ‘80s and bought a couple of Boogies. It was around 2008 and the financial meltdown and I was still making really good money as the editor of FOH Magazine and I checked Craigslist several times a day. I scored on some good gear deals.

About the time I was freaking out over the size of my Monster Pedalboard From Hell, the band went into the studio to record tracks for a new video promo. About eight 30-second song “sound bites.” Per the instructions of the agent who asked for this, no solos. Emphasis on vocals and the horn section. I was playing rhythm guitar and most of it clean so in the interest of simplicity, we ran the guitar direct. There was no way there was room for that board, so I used the rack-mount Tech 21 SansAmp that was in the studio. And I really liked it.

So I emailed the Tech 21 folks who, not being millennials, actually read and answer email. And I explained my situation and asked if they had a solution. I needed something that provided some kind of amp emulation (Tech 21 is NOT modeling but more on that in a bit…) that wasn’t huge but that had at least a good clean rhythm and high-gain lead sound. And they responded quickly saying that what I needed was the Richie Kotzen RK5 Signature Fly Rig. So I asked them to send one for a review and if I liked it I would sell the HD400 and buy it. (I shipped the HD400 to its new owner about a week ago…)

When it arrived I had no idea what the box was. I thought it looked like business cards but I knew I had not ordered new cards in months. I was astounded to open the box and see this little tiny pedal board. I fired it up and was pretty happy but was using it to drive a real amp (an early ‘60s Fender Princeton that I bought at a garage sale 30 years ago and that is in my office). The test would come at the next rehearsal where I planned to run it right into the PA.

WHAT IT IS

On the surface it’s like a three-slot mini pedal board. But there is hidden stuff.

Starting in the middle, there is the famous Tech 21 amp emulation. It can be overdriven but it is voiced for a clean sound. To the left is a very good delay section with a hidden setting that will give you a decent chorus-like sound and to the right is a section titled OMG. This is where the RK really comes in. It stands for Ritchie Kotzen—a hotshot guitar player best known for replacing C.C. DeVille in Poison and Paul Gilbert in Mr. Big and for the band The Winery Dogs with Mike Portnoy and Billy Sheehan. It stands officially as maybe the favorite distortion unit I have ever used. Ever. On it’s own, it’s pretty good. But in conjunction with the dirty rhythm channel on the Mark III it is magic. Getting the rhythm chunk of a 4×12 out of a combo amp is supposed to be impossible. But it just kind of magically happens when the OMG circuit is engaged. It has literally changed the way I play. I am substantially more aggressive when using it.

The RK5 is all-metal and powered by a standard wall-wart style power supply. Oh and I nearly forgot. There is a clean boost available in the OMG section, too.

The rubber really hit the road at the next full band rehearsal. I brought a guitar and the RK5 and two cables and nothing else. The output ran into the rehearsal PA. As mentioned earlier, the Tech 21 stuff is an all-analog emulation of a guitar amp. It is NOT digital modeling. And, I know I’m late to the party, but at this point I am liking it better. There are no weird artifacts and it just sounds chunky and REAL. I dialed in a sound that was pretty close to clean with the guitar volume dialed back and that broke up just a little when the guitar was maxed. The studio where we rehearse has a large selection of good guitar amps including Fenders and Marshalls. And I promise that not using them was not missed at all. It was nothing short of a revelation to be able to carry something so small and get through an entire night.

So, here is where we stand…

I wanted something to use as an emergency backup. What I got was a piece that has become an important part of my rig even when I am using an amp, The RK5 can do double duty and allow me to go direct if my rig bites the dust or if volume concerns demand a direct input. Plus, my board is WAY smaller now. The RK5 has made me more than a bit happier. It’s a keeper.

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The 2016 IAMA (International Acoustic Music Awards) kicks off. http://www.l2pnet.com/2016-iama-international-acoustic-music-awards-kicks-off/ http://www.l2pnet.com/2016-iama-international-acoustic-music-awards-kicks-off/#respond Thu, 14 Jul 2016 15:15:18 +0000 http://www.l2pnet.com/?p=2562 Established in 2004, IAMA promotes excellence in Acoustic Music performance and artistry. It is geared towards today’s best up-and-coming music acts. Acoustic artists in various genres can gain exciting radio and web exposure through this competition. Win a Top Prize of US$11,000 worth of Prizes. Past years’ winners include: Meghan Trainor, Jack Newsome (pictured), Carl […]

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Established in 2004, IAMA promotes excellence in Acoustic Music performance and artistry. It is geared towards today’s best up-and-coming music acts. Acoustic artists in various genres can gain exciting radio and web exposure through this competition. Win a Top Prize of US$11,000 worth of Prizes.

Past years’ winners include: Meghan Trainor, Jack Newsome (pictured), Carl Wockner, Kelley James, AJ Croce, Maddy Rodriguez(Canada), David Francey (Canada), Liz Longley, Charlie Dore (Hit Singer-Songwriter from UK), The Refugees (USA), Fertitta & McClintock, Kate Lush (Australia), Wayne Southards (USA), Larry Pattis (USA), Omega (Uganda), El McMeen, etc. Last year’s winner went to Jack Newsome (see pictured) who won the overall grand prize.

“I am absolutely floored to have won this award, it’s such an honor. As a Meghan Trainor fan it’s pretty surreal to me that we’re both been honored in the same competition” said an elated Jack Newsome, a Berklee College of Music student, who won the top award at IAMA this year.

“I am very excited and surprised to win”, said Meghan Trainor, 6th Annual IAMA Best Female Artist Winner, who stunned the music industry by hitting #1 with a debut single and album on the Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard 200 Album charts respectively last year. Her debut single “All About That Bass” became a mega hit and Meghan has become an international household name, her hit single sold over 12 million copies in the first 6 months. She also won the Grammy Award for Best New Artist.

Judging is based on excellence in music performance, songwriting/composition/song choice, music production and originality/artistry. You can enter in a number of categories such as: Best Male Artist, Best Female Artist, Best Group, Folk, Alternative, AOG (Open Category), etc. Entrants come from all over the world: Australia, Canada, Japan, Brazil, Germany, USA, South Africa, etc.

Win prizes in 8 different categories: Best Male Artist, Best Female Artist, Best Group/Duo, Folk/Americana/Roots, AAA/Alternative, Instrumental, Open and Country/Bluegrass. There will also be an Overall Grand Prize winner awarded to the top winner worth over US$11,000, which includes radio promotion to over 250 radio stations in US and Canada. Winning songs will be heard on radio! Winners and runner-ups will be featured on our CD compilation. Also, we feature up to 10 different artists get featured and promoted on IAMA website every month, which provides a review, ratings, CD information and more.

Winners and finalists of the Awards will be featured in the IAMA website and e-newsletters, read by music press, talent buyers, promoters and other industry insiders. All songs submitted must be submitted must be original and submitted online or via CD, the artist may also perform original material not yet released and written by other songwriters or composers. Cover songs are permitted. Deadline to enter is November 10th.

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